Book Review and Summary: It's the Student, Not the College by Kristin White

"No man should escape our universities without knowing how little he knows."

This month’s book is all about college since October is FAFSA month. This book, It’s the Student, Not the College, by Kristin M. White, an educational consultant is a well-thought out book on the realities of college, of the college admission process, the future of college and what students should do in order to fully become successful in college and all future endeavors. I’ll break down a few of the sections to give you a sense of what’s in it, but for $10, this book will probably be the best investment you will make for yourself and your child.

The Underwear Loan And Other Stupid Stuff We Put on Credit

“Credit buying is much like being drunk. The buzz happens immediately, and it gives you a lift. The hangover comes the day after.”

I recently came across a post on Facebook about how a woman took out what essentially amounted to be a very expensive loan for underwear. I’ve included the text below and you can find it here too. It’s a public post so hope it’s OK for me to repost. Credit to her for admitting to it. Upon reading it, it got me thinking about my own spending habits and the “loans” I’ve taken out by putting certain items on credit so here goes.

Elizabeth Warren, The Two-Income Trap and the Pursuit of Financial Independence

This post is part of the #MommyMoney Series. A series that explores money, motherhood and financial independence. The Two-Income Trap: Why Middle-Class Parents Are (Still) Going Broke is written by Elizabeth Warren with her daughter, Amelia Warren Tyagi. This month’s book is not your typical personal finance book. It doesn’t espouse the same list of recommendations on how to save, what accounts to open, etc. Instead, it is a well researched book about the American family, its American dream and challenges of being middle class in the current financial and government system.

The Six Figure Babysitter: How Stay-At-Home Moms Can Pay Themselves

A stay-at-home mom is a working mom.

I recently read that the annual salary of a stay-at-home mom for 2019 was $178,201 based on an analysis by salary.com. Unfortunately, the reality is that no matter how much these figures have risen over time, stay-at-home moms do not see a single cent of this salary. Before you become a someone else’s caretaker, set money aside if for the sole reason to have it as a cushion for when and if you decide to leave the workforce to care for others.

Book Review & Notes: Out of the Rat Race By Eric Duneau

“Keep your focus. You are planning your financial independence. You are in a different game. Don’t be jealous of their fancy stuff.”

Book Review & Notes: Out of the Rat Race By Eric Duneau is the story of his journey to reach financial independence. It covers everything from the history of money, real-estate investing, the importance of human capital, attitude and how to leverage it all for financial freedom.

Using a ROTH IRA for a House Down Payment

When people hear of an IRA, the Individual Retirement Account, they automatically assume this money is for retirement only. This is one of the great misconceptions about the IRA. It’s helpful to know that an IRA can be used for many things including using it for a house down payment.

The College Series: Breakdown of an Offer Letter - What to Negotiate and Take Advantage Of

This week I met with a few soon to be graduates to review their offer letters and how best to take advantage of them. Many of these students had already accepted their offers, but one still had time to negotiate. In this post, I will cover the components of an offer letter and how best to take advantage of it on the path to financial independence. It’s critical and quite crucial to take steps as early as the time you accept your first full-time job offer to set yourself up for success when it comes to money.

Book Review & Notes: Broke Millennial - Get Your Financial Life Together

You, right now, have a choice: you can let money control and define your life or you can control it. - Erin Lowry, Broke Millennial

This month’s book is Broke Millennial by Erin Lowry. You can read more about Erin on her blog, brokemillenial.com.

The title of the book can peg it as a book specifically for Millennials, but I disagree and encourage you to pick it up if you are looking to up your financial knowledge no matter what age you are. It’s not a book on investing or retirement, which I think makes it better. It’s a comprehensive on the basics of money mindset, credit, student loans and debt. The content in this book provides a good foundation for better money management and eventual wealth creation.

Veterinarian Adopts Low Waste Mindset to Become Debt Free - Michelle's Story

“You will be in debt for the rest of your life.”

That was my welcome into the veterinary profession. Starting as early as when I began my undergraduate studies, if I spoke with a veterinarian, the assertion that I would be in debt for the rest of my life would inevitably come up. Going less waste is what allowed me to break the cycle of mindless consumerism and believe in a future where we can be debt free. I’m so excited to continue to align my actions with my beliefs and can’t wait to see what we can accomplish once we have financial independence. 

Post Roundup: Money Advice for Nurses, Doctors and Those In the Medical Field

Wherever the art of Medicine is loved, there is also a love of Humanity.

After more than 30 years as a nurse (most in the ICU), my mother retired last year just shy of her 62nd birthday. It was her goal to retire before this birthday milestone. She shares her story her as immigrant nurse from the Philippines doing what she could do survive and thrive in a new country. For this blog post, I thought I would round up some of the more popular blogs and posts on personal finance from those who work in the medical industry.

Book Review & Notes: The Power of Zero - How to Get To the 0% Tax Bracket

Social Security was never intended to be a retirement program. It was merely insurance against living too long.

This month’s book review and notes are from The Power of Zero - How to Get To the 0% Tax Bracket and Transform Your Retirement. Learn more about David McKnight over davidmcknight.com and listen to his podcast via YouTube. Fitting since we are just about to close out tax season. Perhaps, the lessons in this book will change the way you manage your money to be more tax efficient now and always.

Post Roundup: Money Advice for Teachers and Educators

Today’s post is a little different. It’s a roundup post of money advice for teachers and educators. For majority of my posts here, I’ve written from the perspective of someone who was in the corporate world. By nature, being in the corporate world has it’s own unique system, terminology, career ladder, retirement, etc. After reading the TIME piece “13 Stories of Life on a Teacher's Salary” late last year, I was aghast at how little we pay and pay attention to the people that are shaping our children’s future.

To that effect, I think it’s equally important that teachers also take it upon themselves to do what they can to get themselves financial independent.

How to Maximize Living at Home With Your Parents for Your Financial Independence Journey

I  have to admit that 18, all I wanted to do was get out of my parents house. Not that I had any issues at home, I just felt I needed some independence. I was pretty lucky because my parents are awesome people. A few years ago, my husband and I came back to live with my parents. It's a strange feeling after being out of the house for over 10 years. So we ended up co-habitating with my parents in our 30s and I have to stay it was not as bad as they say it is. Here are some tips to make the most of this time.

Book Summary: The Little Book of Common Sense Investing

“The two greatest enemies of the equity fund investor are expenses and emotions.”

In honor of the passing of John C. Bogle, found of Vanguard and father of index funds, I picked up the updated edition of his book “The Little Book of Common Sense Investing.” I’ve heard of this book before, but never got around to picking it up. It’s a worthwhile book to read especially for those new to investing or those that need a refresher on the value of investing.

Investing 101 for Women: Resources for the Beginner Investor

The business schools reward difficult complex behavior more than simple behavior, but simple behavior is more effective.

There is absolutely no shortage of investing materials on the internet, but the problem is that there’s too much, it can be overwhelming where to even start. So to help you with that, we’ve compiled a list of resources, from YouTube videos, blog posts and books to help you navigate the world of investing. These are not your mother’s resources.

Book Review & Notes: Financial Freedom by Grant Sabatier of Millennial Money

When the opportunity to sign-up to preview Grant Sabatier’s new book Financial Freedom: A Proven Path to All the Money You Will Ever Need came up, I jumped at the chance and am so glad I did. It is jam packed with actionable insights. More importantly, it gives you a blueprint of how to achieve Financial Independence early on. There’s also an important question that Grant addresses “Why do you want to retire early?” Retirement while your fully financial independent is all about options and its all about choices.